Posted in TED Talks

Art of Seeking Rejection for 100 Days


As part of one of my daily challenges, I vowed myself to watch one TED video every day under each category listed in the TED library. I have corrected my mistakes, laughed like a lunatic at some and learnt some of the best practices shown by world leaders from various walks of life.

I thought it would be great if I can share some of the best videos with you guys. I sincerely hope this weekly series will provide some kind of motivation to you. Feel free to share the video with someone who really needs to see this. After all, sharing is caring!

Today’s Video Category: Adventure

Topic: What I learned from 100 days of rejection by Jia Jiang.

Why I recommend this?

Life is an adventure and filled with rejections and failures along with success. Believe it or not, we all have faced rejection at some point or other. Right from our kindergarten phase to our K-12 and now, even at workplaces, we all have been victims of rejection. The power of rejection cannot be understated. Sometimes, the victim loses his self-confidence. It’s the fear of rejection that stops us from growing to greater heights.

Jia Jang, top keynote speaker on emotional intelligence speaks how we can transform the fear of rejection into a very powerful mechanism to build a new life.

He talks about his experience of facing rejections and addresses the common fears that come along with rejections to every human being. Get ready to laugh and learn the art of facing rejections successfully in your life.

Articles featuring Jia Jang:

Afraid of Rejection? How to avoid it.

How One Entrepreneur Triumphed Over Rejection — 100 Times

This Startup Founder Experienced ‘100 Days of Rejection’ And Learned To Love It: Now He’s A Huge YouTube Star

Header Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Posted in TED Talks

Appreciate What You Have Before It’s Too Late


A long time ago, there was a man who was quite hesitant when it came to appreciate what he had in his life. He had a wonderful partner and a doting family, yet not even once he had expressed his genuine feelings. Eventually one by one, he lost every person from his life. Year after year, he kept losing people, friends and loved ones. He never had a good chance to sit through those people and tell them how much important or loved he felt in their company. As years kept on rolling, he realised how shallow is life. He neither excelled in his personal life or professional, he neither achieved successful relationships nor valuable networks. In the end, he remained a lonely person throughout his life.

One day, he had a chance to meet a monk. Looking at the frown on the man’s face, the monk asked “Dear friend, what is wrong with you? You seem so worried and look defeated”. To this, the man had tears rolling down his cheeks and he sobbingly told the story of his life. The monk patiently listened to his story and gave him a pitiful look. He said “Mate, that is what life is all about. Death and parting is an inevitable phase of life. That is why it is very important to express your feelings and appreciate the good people when they are alive.”

Feelings of regret usually resurface only once the person is gone from our lives. We never make time for those who genuinely care for us. We seldom realise that each day they are one more moment away from death. As I was browsing through the net, I came across this TED video by award-winning artist Tony Luciani and his journey dementia of his mother. I must say this was by far one of the most heart touching TED talk I had ever seen.

Tony Luciani takes you through his passion for photography in a series of wonderful portraits of his mother. Each photo speaks volumes of how a patient with dementia struggles to live a normal life. It also throws light on how those families struggle along with the patient. It is heartbreaking to see a fragment of their memory breaking down every day. The artist explains the painful moment when his mother forgot to recognise him. Tony’s talk is one of courage, resilience, nostalgia, empathy, and moreover a living tale of making the most of life through art, one frame at a time. People like Tony fill light on the joys of caring for elderly parents. Most importantly, it teaches us to acknowledge and appreciate our loved ones while they are alive.

Header Photo by Melanie Wasser on Unsplash

Posted in TED Talks

Why Every Woman Should See This Video Once A Month


As part of one of my daily challenges, I vowed myself to watch one TED video every day under each category listed in the TED library. I have corrected my mistakes, laughed like a lunatic at some and learnt some of the best practices shown by world leaders from various walks of life.

I thought it would be great if I can share some of the best videos with you guys. I sincerely hope this weekly series will provide some kind of motivation to you. Feel free to share the video with someone who really needs to see this. After all, sharing is caring!

Today’s Video Category: Activism

Topic: Why we have too few women leaders by Sheryl Sandberg

Why I recommend this?

If you are looking for a good TED talk under Activism then this has to be it. This talk by Sheryl Sandberg never gets old. It’s a good reminder for all ladies out there who are dropping off from their workforces every day. Don’t leave before you actually leave. Lean in, and make the best use of the opportunities available for you. Not just women, this video also gives a clear picture for all men who seldom fail to understand what it takes to help ambitious women in their lives.

Header Photo by Bonnie Kittle on Unsplash

Posted in TED Talks

3 Things To Learn From Dead People


The purpose of life is not to be happy.

It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

It’s a common sight to see newspapers carrying obituaries. Whenever someone famous dies, the national dailies pay tribute to them with an exceptional headline and a brief about their achievements. Dead people often give us interesting insights about human life. You learn a lot from their mistakes and their decisions. You understand that even the best of the best people in this Universe never had everything figured out in the beginning. They too had their own share of struggles in their lifetime.

One man from India, Mr Laxman Narayana aka Lux Narayan, CEO & Founder of Unmetric – social media benchmarking & competitive intelligence company began his project dedicated to these obituaries. He thought what if we could put together as many obituaries as possible and studied them one by one. He wondered what could be the main messages that these well-lived people impart the current generation. Throughout a span of two years, he managed to study close to 2000 obituaries published by the New York Times.

With the help of data science, Lux and his team studied the words used to describe these famous people. They took the headers used to describe these people and also took words from the paragrpahs of the obiturary. His study included both famous and non-famous, yet high achievers featured on the New York Times.

Here is what he finally concluded.

True growth happens when you choose your path from your heart.

More than 40% of the people featured in the newspaper led a very diverse life. Their careers were not completely focused on traditional professions like an engineer or a doctor. Instead, they comprised of people from theatre, music, tailoring, fashion designing, architecture, editing, designing etc. They proved it again that in order to be successful, one does not need to pursue only Engineering or Medicine.

All things come to you at their own pace. Patience is the key.

Lux and his team studied the average age at which these people accomplished big feats in their life. He found that the average age was 37. Maybe the current generation needs to slow down a bit and try to understand that it is perfectly okay to not having everything figured out by their 20’s. Nobody has everything sorted then and there. We all make mistakes, a lot of them and learn.

True success is measured by the number of times you have helped people genuinely without ulterior motives.

Lux found that the word “help” stood out very clearly from the whole data of famous vs non-famous people. Their attitude towards helping others in society is what made them so remarkable. It was this unique ability to use their skills to help humanity that made them so big. These people believed in the art of giving.

We all live with plans for our future. But, we need to even remember that life is best understood only when we study our history. History is nothing but chronicles of dead people. They offer so many valuable insights into the current day scenarios. So, the next time you find an obituary, try to stop by and read.

Remember that it is important to live a purposeful life. A life driven with purpose serves as a guiding lamp for hundreds of others who are lost in the modern world chaos. We all have a very limited amount of time on this Earth. Let’s make our lives fruitful while we are alive so that our obituaries will have a thing or two for the future generation to learn.

TED Talk by Lux Narayan

Header Photo by Giammarco Boscaro on Unsplash

Posted in TED Talks

How Boredom Can Lead To Your Most Brilliant Ideas


As part of one of my daily challenges, I vowed myself to watch one TED video every day under each category listed in the TED library. I have corrected my mistakes, laughed like a lunatic at some and learnt some of the best practices shown by world leaders from various walks of life.

I thought it would be great if I can share some of the best videos with you guys. I sincerely hope this weekly series will provide some kind of motivation to you. Feel free to share the video with someone who really needs to see this. After all, sharing is caring!

Today’s Video Category: Addiction

Topic: How Boredom Can Lead To Your Most Brilliant Ideas by Manoush Zomordi.

Why I recommend this?

For years before Kindle came in my life, I was a big addict to Instagram, Twitter and WhatsApp. The constant need to check what others are posting was growing onto me. It has taken me exactly that one hack which Manoush Zomorodi suggests in the TED talk. “Delete the app”.

It was only after I deleted, signed out or snubbed the notifications of these apps, I found liberation from my addiction. Addiction, be it towards drugs or phone is a disease and it should be treated like one. Manoush clearly explains how phones ruin our lives and completely take over our mental space. What do we do then, to escape from boredom? She asks us to allow ourselves to be bored. Boredom can lead us to our most brilliant ideas. And apps like Snapchat, Netflix, Facebook just rob us off from this most important ability. Being bored is not dangerous, for it leads to most brilliant ideas. But, being addicted to apps is definitely dangerous. To know more, go ahead and watch the video.

Header Photo by Ashkan Forouzani on Unsplash